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Mackay, Queensland, 22–25 October 2018 2018

Spotlight Sessions

Spotlight 1 - Future Business Employment Scenarios

Facilitator: Dr Jen Cleary, Chief Executive Officer, Centacare & SEGRA National Steering Committee

Dr Jen Cleary is the CEO of Centacare Catholic Country SA, a social services agency providing services across regional, rural and remote South Australia.She holds an honorary position as Associate Professor in the Centre for Global Food and Resources at the University of Adelaide.

Session Context:
By 2030 what we do in every job will change. We already know that there will be a reduction in the need for workers to complete routine manual tasks. More importantly there will be an increasing in the time workers spend focusing on people, solving strategic problems and thinking creatively.

This change means a constantly changing and evolving workforce for which we need to be prepared. The implications are significant not just for employment but also for education.

A recent study by Foundation for Young Australians found that workers will spend 26% less time on management, 14% less time on organisation co-ordination and 10% less time on teaching. Conversely, there will be a 100% increase in work time solving problems, 41% more time on critical thinking and judgement, 77% more time using science and mathematics skills and 17% more time using verbal communication and interpersonal skills.

Most edifying is the evidence that 30% more time will be spent learning on the job.

This session considers what this means in terms of Strategies for education and employment.

Presentations

Location

Hall A

Spotlight 2 - How to Attract Private Sector Investment into Regional, Rural and Remote Economic Development Partnerships

Facilitator: Robert Prestipino, Director, Vital Places Pty Ltd

Robert Prestipino is a trusted authority & strategic advisor for the development of rural and regional Catalyst Projects. He is a qualified Urban Designer, Registered Landscape Architect, corporate member of the Planning Institute and a Certified Economic Developer. He has received national and international awards for his best practice approach to creating better places for people and business. Robert has been responsible for the development of multi-million dollar projects ranging from mainstreet improvements to integrated town centre projects.

Session Context:
The expectation that rural, regional and remote Australia will be increasingly responsible for driving economic investment in their regions has been increasingly apparent in the political discourse. This asserts a changing relationship between business, government and society Access to finance is a critical condition for regional development. However, the transfer of mechanisms to enable access to finance such as addressing commercial in confidence, fiduciary care and conflicts of interest at regional, rural and remote scales are still in the early stages.

Presentations

Location

Meeting Room 1

Spotlight 3 - How Technology and Innovation Provide Business Growth and Social Inclusion Opportunities for Rural, Regional and Remote Australia

Facilitator: Rod Macdonald, Partner, Community Broadband Networks & SEGRA National Steering Committee

Rod is a Co-Founder of Community Broadband Networks, based in Geelong. Over the past decade Rod has been interested in innovation and the application of new technology and has worked to assist the establishment of new industries within the Geelong region. In particular, he is working to encourage the growth of technology based employment, digital inclusion and digital literacy, across the community. He holds a Bachelor of Business from the University of Southern Queensland. Rod served as a councillor at the City of Greater Geelong from 2004 - 2016. In that time he served a term as Deputy Mayor and has held a range of Portfolios including - Planning, Economic Development, Knowledge Economy & Education, Major Projects and Veterans Affairs. Rod served in the RAAF for over 12 years and after completion of his military service worked in manufacturing management within the Geelong region. Rod was the City of Greater Geelong representative on the board of the Australian Smart Communities Association for 5 years and has served on the board of Technology Geelong.

Session Context:
We are in a rapidly changing world - with technology being a key driver of this change. This is the 4th industrial revolution - the age of information. However, we are still in the “T-Model ford” stage of this new era; with much change yet to take place.

To meet these challenges we must challenge ourselves.

Government will not provide the necessary solutions for a community - success will be driven by individuals who live there.

SEGRA believes that communities that are prepared to listen, learn from others, commit to driving change and encouraging a culture of innovation are those that will prosper in the 21st century.

Presentations

Panellists:
Stuart George, Digital Creative Director, CKP Creative Digital Solutions
Ian Aitken, Chief Executive Officer, Unisono Pty Ltd

Location

Meeting Room 3+4

Spotlight 4 - How Regional Australia Adds Value and Value Adds

Facilitator: Lara Wilde, Regional Innovation Coordinator, Ignite FNQ

Lara has successfully worked in local Government, project management, recruitment and retention, economic development and her own private businesses in remote, rural and regional parts of Australia. Throughout her career Lara has honed her commercial project management skills in the areas of community resource projects, infrastructure and agriculture amongst others.

Currently Lara is the Regional Innovation Coordinator for Ignite FNQ fostering innovation the the Far North Qld region and supporting stakeholders to develop innovative services and products and engage with markets such as Asia. Lara’s work with partners such as the FNQ Food Incubator has resulted in new opportunities and new strategies.

Lara also owns Wilde Drive, a business focussing on providing support and advice for people to have safe, simple, stylish adventures on the road. Through Wilde Drive, Lara writes articles for a number of publications and speaks at a variety of events. Wilde Drive also has an online store Wilde Garage that provides performance parts and accessories for automotive enthusiasts. Lara works closely with automotive enthusiasts and innovators throughout Australia to commercialise new products for the industry and develop manufacturing and export options internationally.

Session Context:
Approximately 67% of the value of Australia’s exports comes from regional, rural and remote areas. Additionally, regional Australia also plays a critical role in the Australian tourism industry, which makes a direct contribution to Australia’s GDP of $35 billion per year. Around 45% of tourism expenditure occurs in areas outside of Australia’s capital cities’.

This session will highlight working with Asia including a number of case studies and a presentation about the value add of regional Australian towns.

Presentations

Location

Meeting Room 2

Spotlight 5 - What does Regional, Rural and Remote Australia's Future Workforce Look Like and How are We Going to Get There?

Facilitator: Simon Boughey, Consultant, Boughey and Associates & SEGRA National Steering Committee

Simon Boughey was the Chief Executive Officer for Cherry Growers Australia and is now consulting through his company Boughey and Associates. He has worked and been involved in community and regional development since 1981. He was the National President of Greening Australia from 2000 to 2003. He was the Senior Adviser to the Minister for Primary Industries and Water in Tasmania for several years. He holds a BA in Geography and Psychology, a Graduate Diploma of Recreation Planning in Natural Resources Management and Honours in Antarctic and Southern Ocean Studies He has been involved with SEGRA since the Kalgoorlie conference in 2009 and is a member of the SEGRA National Committee.

Session Context:
Population decline is a significant and specific threat to the socio-economic viability of many rural, regional and remote communities. A variety of policy perspectives have been identified to address this phenomena including allowing natural attrition, advocacy for a stronger incentives for migrants to live in regional Australia, providing incentives such as low rates and land releases to attract residents, marketing to sea changers and tree changers. The relationship between these strategies and regional, rural and remote economic growth are not so well understood. Ideally in-coming population should be attractive to high skilled workers who provide significant value add and create economic growth. This session will look at the projected employment growth areas for regional, rural and remote Australia, the attributes and abilities people who aspire to relocate to rural and regional communities and how well these can adapt to the needs of regional Australia and the people who live and work there.

Presentations

Location

Meeting Room 2

Spotlight 6 - How to Grow Sustainable Regions: supporting economic, social and environmental assets of regional, rural and remote Australia

Facilitator: Graham Stirling, Senior Consultant, Skillset Environment

Graham Stirling is senior consultant with Skillset Environment, overseeing the Built Environment department within the organisation. His main focus is assisting local government and businesses in regional areas develop and benefit from renewable energy infrastructure. He is also chairperson of the Central NSW Renewable Energy Cooperative (CENREC), an organisation founded to actively promote opportunities for community owned renewable energy projects in regional NSW. Originally from the Scottish Borders, Graham recently completed his MSc in Environmental Management with the University of London, focusing on community attitudes towards wind farm developments in the Southern Tablelands of Australia. This will be Graham’s first time attending a SEGRA conference.

Session Context:
Congested cities, water crisis, loss of biodiversity values and natural disaster impacts are key national issues demanding high level intergovernmental planning and implementation for a sustainable future. Development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs (Brundtland Commission 1987) remains highly relevant and important – locally and place based.

Sustainability is a landscape scale issue.

Presentations

Location

Meeting Room 1

Spotlight 7 - Geotourism

Facilitator: Angus M Robinson, Managing Partner, Leisure Solutions

An exploration geologist by profession and training, Angus established his business, Leisure Solutions®, in 1993 and is now engaged in ecotourism/geotourism activities as an eco-certified tour operator. In recent years he has served as inaugural Chair of the Geotourism Standing Committee of the Geological Society of Australia and is a member of the Geotourism Forum of Ecotourism Australia Ltd, serving initially as its Chair. Angus is also the designated spokesperson on geotourism for the Australian Geoscience Council. Over the past two decades, Angus has been engaged in executive roles relating to technology park development and hi-tech industry association work. In earlier years he has enjoyed various executive roles in major tourist attractions and in an alpine conservation/recreation area.

Session Context:
The natural environment should be a strong driver of destination tourism for regional Australia. Geotourism is a rapidly emerging global phenomenon that fosters holistic, nature-based tourism based upon geology and landscape as the basis for providing visitor engagement, learning and enjoyment, all of which serves to shape the character of a ‘georegion’ and to enhance the total visitor experience. Geotourism attractions, particularly UNESCO Global Geoparks, are now being developed around the world primarily as a sustainable development tool for local and regional communities.

This session will include discussion about issues and opportunities that have arisen in recent years as a result of pursuing major geotourism developments in Australia as well as examining some examples of how geotourism concepts are already adding value to regional development. The development of ‘self-drive’ tourism throughout Western Queensland, underpinned by geotourism concepts and driven by digital transformation imperatives, will also be explored. Understanding the transitions occurring in regional Queensland and the opportunities that emerging industries such as geotourism can provide will be discussed as a key to developing resilient communities through the implementation of regional collaboration strategies. The session will also explain how the availability of an appropriately skilled workforce is essential to supporting sustainable economic growth within regions.

Presentations

Location

Meeting Room 3+4

Spotlight 8 - Place-Based Leadership and Regional Economic Development

Facilitator: Robert Prestipino, Director, Vital Places Pty Ltd

Robert Prestipino is a trusted authority & strategic advisor for the development of rural and regional Catalyst Projects. He is a qualified Urban Designer, Registered Landscape Architect, corporate member of the Planning Institute and a Certified Economic Developer. He has received national and international awards for his best practice approach to creating better places for people and business. Robert has been responsible for the development of multi-million dollar projects ranging from mainstreet improvements to integrated town centre projects.

Robert has been responsible for the development of multi-million dollar projects ranging from mainstreet improvements to integrated town centre projects.

Session Context:
Over the past decade increasing attention has been paid within regional research to questions of city and regional leadership and the part played by the deliberative actions of key individuals and institutions in shaping the future of places. This has led to further debate regarding under which circumstances do government agencies take on the place leadership challenge and how do those responsibilities sit with other dimensions of authority and the private sector. There has also been an increasing interest in the role of higher education institutions as place leaders.

This session will use case studies to look at the development of:

Some of the key questions include: Can place based leadership deliver regional economic development? How do key individuals outside institutions and key leaders inside institutions interact in shaping the future of places? Does active leadership effect endogenous growth and how?

Presentations

Location

Hall A

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